To the Wonder

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Terrence Malick’s sixth film, To the Wonder, released last week in select theaters, as well as on demand and on iTunes. It’s a characteristically visceral experience of a film, meaning I STRONGLY suggest you try to see it on the big screen rather than on a computer screen. See here for theater release schedule. 

I have been following Malick’s career with great interest for more than 15 years (basically since I saw The Thin Red Line in 1998), and have written quite a bit about the man and his films. See here, here, here, here and here for a sampling.

So it was with great pleasure that Christianity Today gave me the opportunity to write a lengthy review essay about the film, in which I synthesize the themes and cinematic vision of Malick’s larger body of work by a taking a close look at To the Wonder (which I’ve already seen three times). Below is one section of the review, but if you have a bit of time and you’re a fan of Malick, I’d strongly suggested reading the whole thing.

To the Wonder is about a way of seeing—both seeing the world around us, and seeing ourselves properly, something he embodies not just on screen but in his working process. It’s no coincidence that it begins with the point of view of Marina and Neil’s own cell phone camera (as they travel by train “to the Wonder”). It’s the focusing of our attention via lenses on life: perceiving the beauty in the pretty and the ugly, the thrilling and the mundane, and seeing how it all points heavenward. Christ in all; “All things shining” (The Thin Red Line).

Malick’s camera has a particular gaze. He spends more time than most on almost gratuitous beauty (puffy clouds, swimming turtles, beautiful hands). And his lens lingers on the mundane: empty rooms, walls, appliances, even a laptop displaying a Skype conversation. Everything is interesting to Malick.

Everything except himself. In both To the Wonder and The Tree of Life, the actors portraying the adult Malick (Ben Affleck and Sean Penn, respectively) come across as passive observers—quiet, contemplative, almost awkward bystanders in the movie. They are fitting representations of a man who seems far more comfortable paying attention to the world around him than bringing attention to himself.

Much has been made of Malick’s tendency to hire big-name actors for his films, shoot tons of footage, and then leave them largely or entirely out of the final cut. Rachel Weisz, Michael Sheen, Amanda Peet, and Barry Pepper are among the actors ultimately cut out completely from To the Wonder. Adrien Brody famously thought his three months of intense shooting on The Thin Red Line would result in a starring role, only to find out at the premiere that his part had been reduced to a single line of dialogue. It may be a somewhat cruel trademark (from the big-ego actor’s point of view), but this method is fundamental to Malick’s vision of man’s place in the cosmos.

In this, Malick is suggesting that it’s far more important for us to see well rather than to be well seen. Insofar as cinema has a purpose, it should not be about audiences glorifying actors or actors glorifying themselves, as much as creating an environment of focused vision and contemplation wherein the beauty of this world confronts and perhaps transforms the audience.

The whole of Malick’s oeuvre seems to be a call to put aside our hubris and wake to the Divine all around us. Brad Pitt’s character in The Tree of Life “wanted to be loved because I was great,” but by the end of the film he recognizes that he was foolish for paying no attention to “the glory all around us . . . I dishonored it all and didn’t notice the glory.”

But when Malick speaks of being awakened to the “glory all around us,” what does he mean? Is it a sort of pantheistic deification of nature? A deistic affirmation of some vague, removed divinity? With The Tree of Life and now To the Wonder, I am convinced that he is speaking of “the glory” of the world not in the sense of being the thing to be worshipped but as pointer to the Being to be worshipped, namely the Christian God. To adopt this way of seeing is to engage with external activators of the sensus divinitatis built into our very being—an innate proclivity to suspect God’s existence.

Read the full review at Christianity Today. I’d also suggest you read this fascinating piece on Malick’s filmmaking process for To the Wonder.

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4 responses to “To the Wonder

  1. Brett, i’m going to see To the Wonder tomorrow, and this review is a wonderful entree. What it means to see, to be (versus being seen, a good point you make) comes through nicely in the review. I’ll also be lcosely attending to what is heard (for me, Malick’s use of music is meant to propel the seeing, to immerse the viewer in being).

  2. Brett, I’m so excited to see To the Wonder! I found Malick’s work through your writing, so thank you!

  3. Saw the film last Friday and jotted down a few more reflections:

    -I am anxious to re-watch the film, paying close attention to scenes where characters are opening or shutting blinds/curtains.
    -The deconstruction and reassembly of the clock towards the end (memories and how we experience passing of time time)
    -Importance of scene at end where Ben’s character is in his new house with 2 kids. Such a short scene, but it’s obviously there for a reason.
    -Ben’s job, walking through man made desolation, testing environment for toxic pollution. Symbolism is exploding out of this, just haven’t tied it together.
    -Ben and Olga’s distance was because of intimacy complications resulting from her IUD. Parallels the priests frustration with his lack of intimacy with God.

  4. Brett, I’ve now seen TO THE WONDER a second time, and it captures attention/feeling/will with the pinpoint precision of a falcon diving for a field mouse. Much to say, but one thing I noticed this time that wasn’t as apparent the first is the soundtrack: it resonates throughout (seemingly) with distant echoes of murmuring penitents, as if in prayer or as if, perhaps, also in fear–or wonder. But it is a crowd. It haunts in a way similar to the way the visuals (sun, but also and especially darkness, almost Lynchian passages of darkness) haunt.

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